This is a fairly new concept to me still, but I now see that multiple streams of income are definitely far better than one high income stream as you point out. I now work part time as a hospitalist. That job provides our biggest income stream, but I also work part time for an opioid treatment center, which could easily turn into a full time position if I ever needed it (the owner has told me “you always have a job here”). Additionally, my wife works full time AND she runs an airbnb room out of our home which pulls in easily 1000/month. Those combined with our investments in stocks/bonds give us 5 sources of income. In the past we relied solely on my full time work and it stressed me out knowing that at any time something could happen that could take that away from us (as you listed above). Since I started doing these other things and we diversified our income, I feel much more at ease and relaxed.
However, until we get another reset in valuations (I’m calculating a 40% to 50% correction is justified ), I’ve moved largely to the sidelines. Beginning in July 2013, I began slowly reducing equity exposure and am now sitting firm at 40% with the balance in various forms of 5 yr cd’s and short duration bonds. This is down from over 60% when I ramped up to take advantage of the March 2009 lows.
While residual income can be used to describe the amount of net income after all costs are paid down, it also refers to the amount of money you continue to generate after your initial work is done. There are countless ways to make money, but some are much more time-intensive than others. Active income, for example, refers to when you directly act or perform a service for money, including salaries, wages, tips, commissions, and income from a business you’re actively involved with.
People don’t realize how important this is. Recently an online marketing system, who had thousands of members who depended on it for their income, just shut down without notice. One morning all the members could no longer log in to their back office. Capture pages were gone, built in autoresponder gone, and their email list of subscribers were gone forever. Many were running solo ads and advertising. To make matters worse those who clicked on their links were redirected to the before-mentioned system creator’s new business and their own affiliate id’s. This means that any sale that was made went in their pocket off the backs of their now former members. Working from home is awesome but everyone who does it needs to be cautious and prepared. The best thing to do is earn multiple streams of income, just as this article talks about, and try to have control over your business. Don’t depend on all-ready-made systems. Make your own capture pages, have your own autoresponder, website, etc. This will go a long way to keeping your business alive and income flowing in.
Let’s say a company earns $1 a share and pays out 75 cents in the form of a dividend. That’s a 75% dividend payout ratio. Let’s say the next year the company earns $2 a share and pays out $1 in the form of dividends. Although the dividend payout ratio declines to 50%, due the company wanting to spend more CAPEX on expansion, at least the absolute dividend amount increases.

The rationale for the residual income approach is that it recognizes the cost of equity capital in the measurement of income. Accounting net income includes the cost of debt (i.e. Interest expense), but does not reflect dividends or other equity capital related funding costs. This means that accounting income may overstate returns from the perspective of equity investors, conversely, residual income explicitly deducts all capital costs.

Or, there is another theory for your primary salary – generate enough to have a little excess cash flow, but do it at a place that you can work stress free and have time to dabble in other projects.  A good friend of mine has this setup – he works 10-5 and makes $50,000 a year.  This allows him to easily cover all of his expenses, but the shorter hours and flexibility in his job allows him to pursue his secondary income generating ideas!

What if the manager of the Idaho investment center wants to invest $100,000 in new equipment that will generate a return of $16,000 per year? This would provide residual income of $4,000, which is the amount by which it exceeds the minimum 12% rate of return threshold. This would be acceptable to management, since the focus is on generating an incremental amount of cash.
4) Calculate how much passive income you need. It’s important to have a passive income goal, otherwise, it’s very easy to lose motivation. A good goal is to try and generate enough passive income to cover basic living expenses such as food, shelter, transportation, and clothing. If your annual expense number is $30,000, divide that figure by your expected rate of return to see how much capital you need to save. Unfortunately, you’ve got to then multiply the capital amount by 1.25 – 1.5 to account for taxes. For example, $30,000 / 3% = $1,000,000 in capital needed to generate $30,000 gross. But since you must pay tax on the $30,000 income, you really need closer to $1,250,000 to generate $30,000 in after-tax income at a 3% rate of return.

If you lease a car for three years, its residual value is how much it is worth after three years. The residual value is determined by the bank that issues the lease, and it is based on past models and future predictions. Along with interest rate and tax, the residual value is an important factor in determining the car's monthly lease payments. In capital budgeting projects, residual values reflect how much you can sell the asset for after the firm has finished using it or once the asset-generated cash flows can no longer be accurately forecast.
If you answered " YES!", then you will profit from Robert G. Allen' s Multiple Streams of Income, Second Edition. In these pages, the bestselling author of the #1 megahits Nothing Down and Creating Wealth shows you how to create multiple streams of lifetime cash flow. You' ll learn ten revolutionary new methods for generating over $100,000 a year- - on a part-time basis, working from your home, using little or none of your own money.

I sold back in the mid 80s. We took a second from the guy who purchased it. He paid us 7% a year on the amount he borrowed. That was actually a good thing. In a couple years, he paid the loan off early but we had an early payment clause that paid us six months of interest. I invested the proceeds in the market which was hot at the time. So, that was good. It turned out to be a great investment. My only regret was for diversification purposes, and that guaranteed income stream. We had one section 8 tenant who kept the place spotless, and we could always count on the government to pay. Plus if I had a good tenant, I would keep the rents low but with section 8, it didn’t matter, the government paid most of the rent and increasing the rental didn’t affect the tenant that much.
In mid-2017, I sold my San Francisco rental property for 30X annual gross rent and reinvested $500,000 of the proceeds in real estate crowdfunding. I’m leveraging technology to invest in lower valuation properties with higher net rental yields in the heartland of America. With the new tax policy starting in 2018 capping state income and property tax deductions to $10,000 and limiting interest deduction on mortgages of only $750,000 from $1,000,000, expensive coastal city real estate markets should soften at the expense of non-coastal city real estate.
The bottom line is, it’s smart to have multiple income streams no matter who you are. Why? Because the more ways you can earn money without compromising your integrity, the better off you’ll be. And if you’re self-employed, having multiple income streams is almost essential. Not only will you enjoy a higher income, but you won’t go broke if one stream ends out of the blue.
That income is considered residual income because as long as the apartment is rented and the rent is collected, the income is earned without additional effort. The effort came when the property was purchased and a tenant was found. Each month after that, the money automatically is paid without buying the apartment again or finding the same tenant each month.
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