I wish I had more time to put into real estate. Given the run up since 2012, I may even be interested in selling my condo that I currently rent out. I need to get it appraised to really see what it’s worth, but I think conservatively it’s gone up ~50%, although rent is probably only up ~10% or so. I am bullish on rents going up in the future… mostly in line with inflation, or perhaps even slightly faster due to constricted credit and personal income growth which should provide a solid supply of renters. At this point, I just don’t want to manage the property. I’ll probably look into a property manager as my time is likely worth turning it into a nearly passive investment.
As can be seen from the above table, the corpus of Rs1.41 crore has been invested in a debt fund that conservatively yields around 9.75% per annum. So the idle money earns debt fund yields while a portion of the corpus is withdrawn each month for a period of 15 years till the age of 60. For simplicity, we have considered annual periods but the annual SWP of Rs.18,27,000 will translate into monthly income of around Rs1,52,250. Additionally, since the withdrawal is structured as an SWP, the capital gains tax will only apply on the return portion and not on the principal portion which makes this method a lot more popular and tax efficient.

P.S. I also fail to understand your fascination with real estate. Granted we’ve had some impressive spikes along the way, especially with once in a life time bubble we just went through. But over the long term (see Case Shiller real estate chart for last 100 years ) real estate tends to just track inflation. Why would you sacrifice stock market returns for a vehicle that historically hasn’t shown a real return?


Rich people know the secret to wealth and peace of mind - and that is - having many cash-streams coming into their lives (and accounts!) instead of just one. One cash flow - say a salary or profit from a business - will not provide security in all times. On the other hand, multiple cash-flows provides stability and security. In case one cash-flow vanishes or reduces, the other one gives you comfort and sustenance.
Residual income is the amount of net income generated in excess of the minimum rate of return. Residual income concepts have been used in a number of contexts, including as a measurement of internal corporate performance whereby a company's management team evaluates the return generated relative to the company's minimum required return. Alternatively, in personal finance, residual income is the level of income that an individual has after the deduction of all personal debts and expenses have been paid.
×