Thanks for asking. https://passiveincomemd.com/what-is-passive-income/ gives a good summary of the definition I use. But in brief, it’s income that isn’t proportional to the time you physically put into acquiring it. It doesn’t mean it’s not without work or effort. It’s just that most of the work is done up front and it continues to pay off long after that initial effort. Real estate fits into that box. There’s definitely a spectrum but compared to what we do as doctors, where our compensation is directly linked to our time, most of these things are quite passive.
Why did P2P lending get a liquidity ranking of 6? It is quite possibly the most illiquid investment option you listed. You said you rank liquidity by “difficulty level of withdrawing your money without a massive penalty”, and for Lending Club notes, it’s not only difficult and extremely time consuming to sell all of your notes in their super illiquid market, but you would have to sell your notes at large losses to hope to get others interested in buying your notes. On top of that, it is impossible to withdraw your money any other way other than just waiting for interest/principal to pay off every month until maturity in 3 to 5 years. You can’t just one day tell Lending Club “I want to quit, please give me my money back.” One can even argue that it is less difficult to sell a home (in order to “withdraw” the money invested) than to withdraw all of their money from a P2P loan portfolio because it is very possible to sell a home before 3 to 5 years.
Passive income is the gap in my financial plans at the moment. I started investing nearly 2 years ago but I’m so close to the beginning of that journey that I don’t quite see it as making income yet. I’ve been better with employer pensions and they’ve grown a really good amount over the last 12 months, but I won’t get my hands on them for a long time yet.

The first form of residual income, the leftover cash after bills and expenses are paid, is important when a person is growing their savings account or is seeking a loan or financing. When getting a loan, there must be an adequate amount of residual income available to ensure a person has the money to make the loan payments each month. If there is not adequate residual income, financing or loans will not likely be approved.

Investing in real estate: Investing in real estate offers more passive income cash potential - but more risk - than investing in stocks or bonds. You'll need substantial amounts of cash to invest in buying a home -- it usually takes 20% down to land a good home mortgage loan. But history shows that home prices usually rise over time, so buying home a for $200,000 and selling it for $250,000 over a five-year time period, for example, is a reasonable expectation when investing in real estate.


Vanguard: Vanguard has a minimum of $50,000 and a fee of 0.3%. Rebalancing is done automatically once every quarter and tax loss harvesting is done on a client-by-client basis. We included Vanguard because clients who invest between $50,000-$500,000 have access to a team of financial advisors. Those with accounts over $500,000 will have a dedicated advisor.
Rich people know the secret to wealth and peace of mind - and that is - having many cash-streams coming into their lives (and accounts!) instead of just one. One cash flow - say a salary or profit from a business - will not provide security in all times. On the other hand, multiple cash-flows provides stability and security. In case one cash-flow vanishes or reduces, the other one gives you comfort and sustenance.
Residual income valuation (RIV; also, residual income model and residual income method, RIM) is an approach to equity valuation that formally accounts for the cost of equity capital. Here, "residual" means in excess of any opportunity costs measured relative to the book value of shareholders' equity; residual income (RI) is then the income generated by a firm after accounting for the true cost of capital. The approach is largely analogous to the EVA/MVA based approach, with similar logic and advantages. Residual Income valuation has its origins in Edwards & Bell (1961), Peasnell (1982), and Ohlson (1995).[1]
Consider the example of a business owner whose desk had a useful life of seven years. How much the desk is worth at the end of seven years (its fair market value as determined by agreement or appraisal) is its residual value, also known as salvage value. To manage asset-value risk, companies that have numerous expensive fixed assets, such as machine tools, vehicles, or medical equipment, may purchase residual value insurance to guarantee the value of properly maintained assets at the end of their useful lives.
Managerial accountants define residual income as the amount of operating revenues left over from a department or investment center after the cost of capital used to generate the revenues have been paid. In other words, it’s the net operating income of a department or investment center. You can also think of it as the amount that a department’s profits exceed its minimum required return.
Sam, it’s actually incredibly complicated if you have high income. The tax law counts all of your income, not just qualified business income, in determining if you qualify for the deduction or not. Given you have over $200,000 in passive income your situation might be very different. For high income earnings you start having to pass specific tests that limit the amount of deduction you can claim. Specifically you can only claim a deduction up to 50% of the W-2 wages your business pays or 2.5% of the assets of the business. With an online business you probably don’t have PP&E so the 2.5% doesn’t help you and you probably aren’t paying out W-2 wages to any employees either. I would consult with your accountant because unfortunately if you make enough money you might not get a deduction at all.
Of course, before you start making significant money from your investment, you’ll need to invest a lot of time, some money, and incredible effort into your project or business. You’ll also need to have a lot of patience, dedication and a vision for your residual income in the future. Delayed gratification is a must when it comes to residual income.
"That's certainly true for entrepreneurs, but even for people who work inside a company, cultivating a side income stream of some sort — whether it's having an Etsy store on the side, or doing a little bit of coaching or having a workshop now and then, whatever it is, doing a little bit of paid speaking — having that sideline gives you additional protection against uncertainty and also has a lot of other benefits.
If you know anything well, a place, how to fix something, how to make something, how to do something, you can write a guide for it. You can sell your guide as an e-book, offer it as a download for a fee on your site or reach out to bloggers with similar content and ask if they will offer it as a paid download on their website (for a price of course).
I am almost 50 years old and have invested during the dot.com and the 08/09 bear markets. I spent over a decade having my portfolio stay the same as what I had put in originally. At this stage I am fine with more fixed income and I also keep my extra properties empty or allow my adult kids to live there. I really enjoy using my assets to do some good for those I care about. I probably get more joy from that than just seeing the net worth build up.
Well, first, you shouldn’t buy into the hype. Don’t allow these network marketers to sell you this so-called dream. It doesn’t quite work that way. You won’t get rich by sending out emails or “driving traffic” to some squeeze page. It will be nominal at best, and when you set your hopes high, you’ll end up getting discouraged like the others. In order to “truly make it” as an internet marketer, you need a huge following. We’re talking tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of email subscribers. Yes, that many.
Managerial accountants define residual income as the amount of operating revenues left over from a department or investment center after the cost of capital used to generate the revenues have been paid. In other words, it’s the net operating income of a department or investment center. You can also think of it as the amount that a department’s profits exceed its minimum required return.
Although adding income streams takes time, creating them within your current business is faster and easier than starting completely new income streams from scratch. This method of generating extra sources of income works well for any size business in any industry. For example, Amazon.com started by selling books. Today it sells thousands of other products including its own product, the Kindle, is a print and digital publisher, and now produces television shows. Many service-based business owners add coaching and books to their income streams.
Writing an e-book is very popular among bloggers, as many have noted that “it's just a bunch of blog posts put together!” You will not only have to make an investment of time and energy to create the e-book, but market it correctly. However, if marketed correctly (through blogging affiliates in your niche, for example), you could have residual sales that last a very long time.
Rich people know the secret to wealth and peace of mind - and that is - having many cash-streams coming into their lives (and accounts!) instead of just one. One cash flow - say a salary or profit from a business - will not provide security in all times. On the other hand, multiple cash-flows provides stability and security. In case one cash-flow vanishes or reduces, the other one gives you comfort and sustenance.
Came to the U.S. as an immigrant in 1968 from a poor Asian country with only $100 in my pocket. Took advantange of 401-K savings plan by contributing 10% of my pay. My employer matched the first 6% savings (50 cents/dollar saved). Did not know anything about investment so 100% of 401-k money was invested in index 500. No other savings except 401-K. Retired in 1999 at 55 years old with about $1.2 million in 401-K and $450,000 lump sum pension which I rolled over to IRA. I invested this money in bonds and only buy equities (small cap index) whenever value drop to at least 50% of its high. I made a lot of money by investing in small cap index (ticker, IWM). Because of the risk involved, I don’t buy individual stock.
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